IB Diploma Programme

International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme

The IB Diploma Programme, for students aged 16 to 19, is an academically challenging and balanced programme of education with final examinations that prepares students for success at universities and beyond. The programme was established in 1968 to provide students with a balanced education, to facilitate geographic and culture mobility and to provide international understanding. This is the most recognized pre-university programme for admission to the best colleges across the world.

FAQ

1. What is IB ?

The International Baccalaureate (IB) is a Swiss Foundation registered in 1968.

The activities of the organization are determined by an Act of Foundation approved by the Swiss Government.

It is a non-profit educational foundation, motivated by its mission, focused on the student. It offers international education based on pedagogical practices derived from latest research findings. The organization was founded in 1968 with its headquarters based in Geneva, Switzerland. It currently works with 3,709 schools in 147 countries to develop and offer four challenging programmes to over 1,158,000 students aged 3 to 19 years.

The IB offers four programmes for students aged 3 to 19. The programmes can be offered individually or as a continuum by IB World Schools.

  • The Primary Years Programme (PYP) for students aged 3 to 12 started in 1997 and is now offered by 1,124 IB World Schools.

  • The Middle Years Programme (MYP) for students aged 11 to 16 started in 1994 and is now offered by 1,049 IB World Schools.

  • The Diploma Programme (IBDP) for students aged 16 to 19 started in 1968 with first examinations in 1970 and is now offered by 2,463 IB World Schools.

  • The Career-related Certificate (IBCC) for students aged 16 to 19 is a new programme within the IB.

At JGIS, we are authorized to offer the International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme (IBDP).

2. What is the IB Diploma Programme ?

The IB Diploma Programme (DP) is an academically challenging and balanced programme of education with final examinations that prepare students, aged 16 to 19, for success at university and life beyond. It has been designed to address the intellectual, social, emotional and physical well-being of students.

IBDP encourages critical thinking and application through the study of a wide range of subjects while encouraging an international perspective. Students ideally take six subjects and as part of the core requirements engage in:

  • Creative artistic pursuit, physical activities and community service projects through Creativity, Action, Service (CAS).
  • Individual research work through the Extended Essay (EE), a 4000 words essay on any one subject area of students' interest.
  • Indulge in activities like debates, presentations, writing journals/essay through study of Theory of Knowledge (TOK).

3. What is special about IBDP compared to other Curriculum ?

Subject matter taught in various curriculum are more or less the same. So what makes the difference? The difference arises in the way it is taught and assessed. In IBDP the whole pedagogical approach is different; subjects are integrated with each other.

Theory of Knowledge helps the student understand the subtle differences between the way knowledge is acquired in the various areas of knowledge. Projects, Assignments, Oral Presentations etc. make sure that the student gains crucial life skills like Communication Skills, Psycho-Social or Inter-Personal skills, International Mindedness, Collaborative Skills, Decision Making, Critical Thinking and most importantly Self-Management Skills.

Assessment is a very small component of recollection (which promotes rote learning); most of the assessment is done based on application and skill based questions. Over the years the subject content would vary. What seems important today may not be important tomorrow. This would mean that the subject content provided today may be obsolete tomorrow by the time our students are getting ready for employment.

The life skills which the students gain through IB Diploma Programme always would come to their rescue when faced with a new challenge or a new situation. World over, IB Diploma students are known to be inquisitive life-long learners who understand that the other people with their differences, can also be right.

4. How many subjects do I need to study ?

In Full Diploma Programme students take six subjects, 3 at higher level and 3 at standard level. Students must choose one subject from each of the group from 1 to 5, thus ensuring breadth of experience in languages, social studies, the experimental sciences and mathematics. The sixth subject may be an art subject chosen from group 6, or the student may choose another subject from group 1 to 5. Higher Level (HL) subjects have 240 teaching hours approximately which give students the opportunity to study these subjects in great depth, while Standard Level (SL) courses cover 150 teaching hours.

5. If I don't want to, or can't complete the full Diploma, what can I do ?

A student who does not satisfy the requirements of the full Diploma Programme, or who has elected to take fewer than six subjects, is awarded a Statement of Grades (Certificate) for the examinations completed. One of the key requirements of achieving a diploma is completing the core requirements - Theory of Knowledge (TOK), Extended Essay (EE), and Creativity, Action, Service (CAS).

6. How is the grading done in IB diploma programme ?

The marks awarded for each subject range from 1 (lowest) to 7 (highest). Students can also be awarded up to three additional points for their combined results on Theory of Knowledge and the Extended Essay. The full diploma is awarded to students who gain at least 24 points, and have satisfactory participation in Creativity, Action, and Service (CAS). The highest total that a Diploma Programme student can be awarded is 45 points.

Students are assessed both internally and externally. The percentage of internal and external assessment varies from subject to subject.

External assessment: Examinations form the basis of assessment for most subjects because of their objectivity and reliability. There are also a small number of other externally assessed pieces of work, for example, Theory of Knowledge Essays, Extended Essays and world literature assignments. These are completed by students over an extended period under teacher's supervision, and are then marked by external examiners.

  • There are a series of written examinations at the end of the course, which may consist of two or three separately written examination papers.

  • Conventional external examination techniques are chosen from a variety of options including short responses, structured questions, text responses, data-based questions, essays and multiple-choice questions.

  • Taken together, this approach is considered to deliver higher levels of reliability in assessing students

Internal assessment: Internal assessment is an important component of the IB Diploma assessment process. This recognizes the professional role of the teacher and gives students a chance to show what they can do over a time, not just in the pressured context of a final examination without access to outside resources.

  • Internal assessment usually accounts for 20-30% of the final grade in a subject.

  • Marks awarded for internal assessments are externally moderated by IB examiners to ensure international parity.

  • Internal assessment typically includes teacher evaluation of work done in class, homework assignments, special projects, notebooks and laboratory procedures.

7. How are IBDP students assessed ?

An essential principle of IB assessment is that standards are the same worldwide. IB examiners represent many cultural and academic traditions, yet the organization measures student performance according to established standards and criteria that are consistent from place to place and year to year. Over the two-year teaching period, a variety of assessment methods are used to acknowledge both the content and the process of academic achievement and to take into account different learning styles.

Final examinations in each subject take place in either May or November. Students' work is assessed by international teams of examiners, who are themselves trained and monitored by the IBO.

Following are the conditions to obtain an IB DIPLOMA:

The following is an excerpt from General Regulations: Diploma Programme (March 2011) which explains all the requirements for getting the diploma:

Article 13: Award of the IB diploma

13.1 All assessment components for each of the six subjects and the additional IB diploma requirements must be completed in order to qualify for the award of the IB diploma, except under the conditions stipulated in articles 23 and 24 of these regulations.

13.2 If a diploma candidate is awarded a grade E for TOK or a grade E for the extended essay, The candidate must achieve 28 points or more to be eligible for the diploma. However, if a candidate is awarded an E for both TOK and the extended essay requirement, the candidate will not qualify for the diploma regardless of the total number of points achieved.

13.3 The IB diploma will be awarded to a candidate, whose total score is 24, 25, 26 or 27 points, Provided all the following requirements have been met.

  • Numeric grades have been awarded in all six subjects registered for the IB diploma.

  • All CAS requirements have been met.

  • At least a grade D has been awarded for both TOK and the Extended Essay.

  • There is no grade 1 in any subject.

  • There is no grade 2 at higher level.

  • There is no more than one grade 2 at standard level.

  • Overall, there are no more than three grades 3 or below.

  • At least 12 points have been gained in higher level subjects (candidates who register for four higher level subjects must gain at least 16 points at higher level).

  • At least 9 points have been gained on standard level subjects (candidates who register for two standard level subjects must gain at least 6 points at standard level).

  • The candidate has not been found guilty of malpractice by the IB Organization.

13.4 The IB diploma will be awarded to a candidate whose total score is 28 points or above, provided all the following requirements have been met.

  • Numeric grades have been awarded in all six subjects registered for the IB diploma.

  • All CAS requirements have been met.

  • Grades A (highest) to E (lowest) have been awarded for both TOK and an extended essay, with a grade of at least D in one of them.

  • There is no grade 1 in any subject.

  • There is no more than one grade 2 at higher level.

  • There are no more than three grades 2 at standard level.

  • Overall, there are no more than three grades 3 or below.

  • At least 11 points have been gained on higher level subjects (candidates who register for four higher level subjects must gain at least 14 points at higher level).

  • At least 8 points have been gained on standard level subjects (candidates who register for two standard level subjects must gain at least 5 points at standard level).

  • The candidate has not been found guilty of malpractice by the IB Organization.

13.5 A maximum of three examination sessions are allowed in which to satisfy the requirements for the award of the IB diploma. The examination sessions need not be consecutive.

8. What is the Core Requirement in the IBDP ?

  • Extended Essay:
    The extended essay of some 4,000 words offers the opportunity for IB students to investigate a topic of special interest related to one of the student's six Diploma Programme (DP) subjects/disciplines. An extended essay can also be undertaken in world studies. The world studies extended essay provides students with the opportunity to carry out an in-depth interdisciplinary study of an issue of contemporary global significance, utilizing two IB diploma disciplines. Both types of extended essay (single-disciplinary and interdisciplinary essays )are intended to promote high-level research and writing skills, intellectual discovery and creativity expected at university. They provide students with an opportunity to engage in personal research in a topic of their own choice, under the guidance of a supervisor (a teacher in the school). This leads to a major piece of formally presented, structured writing, in which ideas and findings are communicated in a reasoned and coherent manner, appropriate to the subject or issue chosen.

  • Theory of knowledge (TOK)
    TOK plays a special role in the Diploma Programme by providing an opportunity for students to reflect on the nature of knowledge, and on how we know what we claim to know. The fundamental question of TOK is "how do we know that?" Students are encouraged to think about how knowledge is arrived at in different disciplines, what the disciplines have in common and the differences between the disciplinary. TOK therefore both supports and is supported by the study of other DP subjects, as students are required to explore knowledge questions against the backdrop of their experiences in their other DP subjects. Discussions and critical reflections form the backbone of the TOK course. TOK is externally assessed through a written essay and a presentation externally moderated.

  • Creativity, Action, Service (CAS)
    CAS - Creativity - Action - Service at the heart of the Diploma Programme. CAS enables students to live the IB learner profile in real and practical ways, to grow as unique individuals and to recognize their role in relation to others.CAS is organized around the three strands of Creativity, Action and Service defined as:

    • Creativity - arts and other experiences that involve creative thinking

    • Action - physical exertion contributing to a healthy lifestyle, complementing academic work elsewhere in the IB Diploma Programme

    • Service - an unpaid and voluntary exchange that has a learning benefit for the student.

    Students develop skills and attitudes through a variety of individual and group activities that provide students with opportunities to express their passions, personalities and perspectives. CAS complements a challenging academic programme in a holistic way, providing opportunities for self-determination, collaboration, accomplishment and enjoyment.

9. Why Universities world over value the IB Diploma Programme ?

Students passing out of the IB Diploma Programme demonstrate high level of academic intellect and organizational skills required to excel at tertiary level. Universities world over recognize the rigor of the programme by offering credits to IB Diploma students, exempting them from the first year courses where the students has scored grade of 5 or above. This helps the students to accelerate their study abroad by finishing 6 months to one year ahead of their study duration. In most colleges abroad IBDP students are given preference over students from other curriculum.

10. Can IBDP students apply to Indian Universities ?

The popularity of IBDP is increasing in India in the recent past, more and more Indian universities are accepting students into their programmes. Association of Indian Universities (AIU) recognizes IB Diploma as equivalent to Higher Secondary Certificate (HSC); this makes students of IB Diploma eligible for applying into various universities. Universities may require the students to procure an equivalence certificate from AIU or the eligibility department of the university.

Further information on India recognition of IBDP could be obtained from the website of Association of Indian Universities:
http://www.aiuweb.org/evaluation/evaluation.asp

11 Which subjects are offered at JGIS ?

Group 1

Group 2

Group 3

Group 4

Group 5

Group 6

English A: Lang-Lit

Hindi B

Economics

Physics

Math HL

Visual Arts

Hindi A:Literature

English B

Business and Management

Chemistry

Math SL

 

 

French B

Information Technology in Global Society

Biology

Math SSL

 

 

French Ab Initio

Environmental Systems and Society

Environmental Systems and Society

 

 

Note: It is possible to drop Group 6 and group 3 and take three sciences to meet eligibility requirements for University admissions in India.

It is possible to drop Group 6 and take an additional Group 3 or Group 4 subject, depending on eligibility requirements for University admissions in India.

12. How do I decide between pursuing IBDP or CIE AS/A level courses ?

Every curriculum has its merits.

At JGIS we offer Cambridge Primary Checkpoint, Cambridge Checkpoint, IGCSE, and AS/A level courses along with IBDP.

IBDP curriculum lays stress on the process of realizing the learner's profile. Internal assessment in each subject ensures that students also devote sufficient time to the ongoing teaching learning process. The process trains students to get into the habit of daily work and meeting deadlines. IBDP provides an opportunity to the students to study a given subject at higher level or standard level thus allowing them to make informed choices in selecting a difficulty level. Several foreign universities recognize the rigour that IBDP puts the students through to ready them for undergraduate courses and award them credits for achieving minimum 5 points in subjects at Higher Level. Additionally, core requirements like Theory of Knowledge, Extended Essay, and CAS are character building courses.

We recognize that doubts may arise in selection of IBDP or AS/ A Level. For this purpose, JGIS has a qualified academic counselor on campus to aid students select an appropriate course.

13. My child has done his/her schooling in CBSE/CISCE/State Board. Would this put my child at a disadvantage over those students who have studied MYP or IGCSE ?

No. IBDP is suitable for students irrespective of any curriculum board. Every curriculum of various examining bodies seeks to empower and equip a student to be best prepared for higher secondary education after having completed grade 10.

14. My child has not scored well in grade 10 examination? Wouldn't IBDP be a very difficult course to pursue ?

IBDP is not a grade/marks centric curriculum. Instead it focuses on the process and seeks to develop attitudes in students that would enable him/her to be life-long learners. To this effect, IBDP seems to be a good alternative to those students who are victims of exam pressure. Assessment in IBDP is staggered over two years with internal examinations carrying upto 30 % weightage.

15. How does IB grade students ?

Diploma Programme students follow six courses at higher level or standard level. The grades awarded for each course range from 1 (lowest) to 7 (highest). Students can also be awarded up to three additional points for their combined results on Theory of Knowledge (TOK) and the Extended Essay (EE). Therefore, the highest total that a Diploma Programme student can be awarded is 45 points.

The diploma is awarded to students who gain at least 24 points, subject to certain minimum levels of performance across the whole diploma and to satisfactory participation in creativity, action and service (CAS).

16. Where can I find more information about IB ?

You are welcome to contact the IBDP coordinator, JGIS at ibdpcoordinator@jgcampusindia.com

You could also visit the official IB website www.ibo.org

17. What are the key features of IBDP at JGIS ?

  • College counselling - university tie-ups

  • World-class faculty - trained ad experienced in IBDP

  • Teacher student ratio - 1:8

  • Spectrum of co-curricular activities, well balanced with academic rigour

  • Technology enabled campus

  • Day boarding & Residential